TPMS Legalities and the Importance of TPMS Education

In 2011, the Tire Industry Association and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration got together to address scenarios that tire dealers and service bays commonly face when performing service on vehicles with dead or defective TPMS sensors. One of the major scenarios that service bays across the nation encounter is a matter of cost and the customers willingness to replace one or more defective TPMS sensors. Without the proper training and education, technicians and staff may have a difficult time explaining the importance of TPMS and why replacing defective sensors is beneficial to the customer. Due to the lack of TPMS training, some service bays simply remove the sensors and deactivate the system all together. A decision like this puts both the customer and service bay at risk. If the customer gets into an automotive accident that can be attributed to under or overinflated tires, the service bay can be held responsible for neglecting to properly service the vehicle’s standard safety equipment. It is in fact, illegal to disable a TPMS system, regardless of whether replacements are cost-prohibitive for the customer.

Title 49, U.S. Code 31022(b) of the Motor Vehicle Safety Act (MVSA): Prohibits a manufacturer, distributor, dealer, or motor vehicle repair business from knowingly making inoperative any part of a device or element of design installed on or in a motor vehicle in compliance with an applicable motor vehicle safety standard.

For more information, please go to: http://www.tpmsdirect.com/TPMS_Legalities_a/772.htm

TPMSDirect is your #1 source for the latest in OEM TPMS technology, industry news, and technical know-how. If your service bay is interested in incorporating TPMS service into its standard procedures, please email us at Customer.Service@TPMSDirect.com for more information.

157 Viking Ave.
Brea, CA. 92821
(714) 482-3996
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NHTSA TPMS Report Reinforces the Effectiveness of TPMS

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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has concluded it’s 58 page report: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of TPMS in Proper Tire Pressure Maintenance. 

The report documents the effectiveness of TPMS by touching base on various sub topics including: gallons of fuel saved, money saved, and a comparison of TPMS equipped vehicles and non-TPMS equipped vehicles that have one or more severely underinflated tires.

The findings in the report are quite staggering. It’s definitely worth taking a look at. To read the report, please go to: http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811681.pdf

157 Viking Ave.
Brea, CA. 92821
(714) 482-3996